ILA’s 17th Annual Conference in Barcelona

Looking for funding to attend ILA’s 17th Annual Conference in Barcelona?

If you are a student or recent graduate (within 1-year), submit your paper to the Kenneth E. Clark Student Research Award.  If your paper wins, you’ll receive a free trip to ILA’s 17th annual global conference in Barcelona (air, hotel, and conference registration) PLUS a $1,000 cash prize PLUS a guaranteed presentation slot in the program to share your research.

See complete submission details at: http://goo.gl/QUDwQ9

The International Leadership Association (ILA) is pleased to join with the Center for Creative Leadership (CCL) to co-sponsor the annual Kenneth E. Clark Student Research Award to recognize outstanding unpublished papers by undergraduate and graduate students. The award is named in honor of the distinguished scholar and former Chief Executive Officer of CCL.

Looking for additional opportunities for students at ILA Barcelona?

Fredric M. Jablin Doctoral Dissertation Award (Deadline July 6) Details: http://goo.gl/V40Tzg

9th Annual Student Case Competition (Sign-Up by Sep. 13) Details: http://goo.gl/gaRNqo

 

P.S.  Registration for ILA Barcelona is now open.  Visit the conference home page at http://goo.gl/CMvyzj for details.

Dr. Ricardo Smith recent Ph.D. graduate featured in City Beat

Good news,

 

Dr. Ricardo Smith and his research is featured in this week’s City Beat. Although the article does not credit Union for his dissertation, it is good exposure for the important work Dr. Smith is doing. I really enjoyed meeting him and telling his story.

 In addition to the City Beat feature, he was profiled on our web and interviewed by a local radio station.

 Here is the link to City Beat http://npaper-wehaa.com/city-beat//#2015/06/03/?article=2527984&dpg=1&z=92

 

Here is the link to blog profile https://www.myunion.edu/spotlight-on-alumnus-dr-ricardo-y-smith/

 

Here is the link to his radio article http://wvxu.org/post/small-study-points-problems-local-prison-re-entry#stream/0

Spotlight on Alumnus Dr. Ricardo Y. Smith

Dr Ricardo Y Smith

What are the most critical issues facing post-prison African-American men in Hamilton and Butler counties?

Employment
Housing
Registering to vote

Alumnus Dr. Ricardo Y. Smith (Ph.D. 2014) gives voice to local men facing these issues in his 2014 doctoral dissertation, No Way Out: Giving Voice to the Post-Prison Experiences of African-American Men in Two Ohio Counties.

Dr. Ricardo Smith is a Gulf War Veteran (1990-1994), a distinguished honor graduate from the United States Army Signal School in Augusta, Georgia, and an adjunct instructor in psychology at Cincinnati State Technical & Community College. Dr. Smith spent three and a half years researching and two months interviewing 10 formerly incarcerated African American men from Hamilton and Butler counties. A critical interpretative analysis conducted through in-depth interviews that examined the post-prison lives of African American men, his study addressed the post-prison obstacles of ex-offenders as they struggled to find employment, housing, and registering to vote. Dr. Smith examined the problems and the impact of labeling prisoners and investigated the issues of prison debt and prison money-making plots. The policy restraints impacting the lives of ex-offenders (who usually come from targeted poor communities) are described as an apparatus of social control, particularly upon African-American men. He found that ex-offenders often experience a post-prison system of no way out that has become a type of social incarceration.

Dr. Smith’s research questions focused on the post-prison impact on the lived experiences of 10 African American men. His hope was to give voice to these men as they attempt to rebuild their lives after prison, particularly as it relates to two questions:

• When returning to communities where social barriers exist and persist, what barriers do the men recognize? To what extent do these barriers affect their lives post-prison?

• To what extent do the men recognize the impact of the criminal label (criminal for life) on their lives post-prison? How does this label affect them when they are seeking employment, permanent housing, and trying to vote?

Dr. Smith hopes that scholars can better understand the dynamics of what it means to (re)live life post-prison. His recommendations for future research include the necessity to examine how and why the lack of employment remains the number one problem for returning citizens after prison. The men he interviewed returned to communities where jobs and housing remain scarce. If the returning citizen does not go to a halfway house or have family housing support, there are very few housing options through public assistance. Not being able to find housing or employment has been shown to lead to significant relapse implications and high probable rates of recidivism.

Dr. Smith points out that the ethnic minority prison population continues to rise. As a people, African Americans make up less than 15 percent of the U.S. population but almost 43 percent of the U.S. prison population. Are African Americans more criminal? Dr. Smith says the answer is no, but does answer yes to the fact that black persons are convicted and sent to prison statistically more often than other ethnic groups, particularly for federal drug convictions. He sees it as a racialized mechanism of incarceration that has produced a major social problem for young black teens and men.

More research is needed to evaluate and gauge the success of reentry and reintegration. Without statistics and stories to measure work and housing efficacy of ex-offenders, how can reintegration or rehabilitation be effective in terms of successful reentry? Without a permanent address, being registered to vote becomes another barrier of reintegration. Dr. Smith explains that ex-offenders need a second chance to redeem themselves and become contributing citizens in society. First steps of viable employment, housing, and the opportunity to vote will give the returning citizen a chance of true reintegration into the community. Reinvestment in people will increase public safety and reduce recidivism for the collective betterment of society and all communities.

In addition to his 2014 Ph.D. in Interdisciplinary Studies from Union Institute & University, Dr. Smith holds a master’s degree in Human Relations (Applied Psychology) from the University of Oklahoma, and a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science from the University of Cincinnati.

Dr. Smith’s dissertation about post-prison experiences of African Americans was featured on WVXU radio in Cincinnati in April 2015.

Learn more about Union’s Ph.D. in Interdisciplinary Studies program.

 

Philosophy Born of Struggle 2015 Call for Papers

PHILOSOPHY  Born To Struggle XXII 2015 Annual Meeting

November 6-7, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT
Embodied Philosophy and Epistemologies of Liberation could refer to any number of strategies or conceptualizations imagined by oppressed peoples to deal with the various manifestations of (neo) colonial, (neo) liberal, sexual, and psychic oppression. Questions emerging from this year’s theme include: Do embodied philosophies challenge the notion of philosophy itself? Can embodied philosophy aim to be universalizable? If philosophies are necessarily situated, products of time and place, what are the theoretical benefits and limitations of Black, feminist, working class, or queer consciousness? Are there epistemic consequences of both oppression and the cultivation of ignorance that effect liberation? What would epistemic independence or epistemic liberation look like? Is anywhere or anyone free of epistemic ignorance? In a world full of epistemic obstructions and dehumanization, how can the oppressed construct livable futures? How do the oppressed gain clarity through the concepts of new slaves and a reinvented Jim Crow? What are the values of ideal and non-ideal theories of justice in the face of fragmented epistemologies? PBS welcomes any papers inspired by or creatively engaging this year’s theme. The

 
Philosophy Born of Struggle (PBS)conference was first organized in 1993 by J. Everet Green at Rockland Community College, and officially took on the name Philosophy Born of Struggle several years later to continue the study and traditions announced by Leonard Harris’s anthology Philosophy Born of Struggle: Anthology of Afro- American Philosophy from 1917.
Every year PBS enjoys being hosted by universities, colleges, and community colleges throughout the country. For over two decades, PBS has remained a traveling conference dedicated to bringing Africana philosophy to various communities, be they academic or not, in the United States. PBS is an interdisciplinary and open philosophical community. We welcome interlocutors from all traditions, including but not limited to Afrocentrism, womanism, feminism, queer/quare/trans theory, Marxism, Pan-Africanism, pragmatism, and existentialism. We also welcome participants regardless of discipline and professional affiliation.
More information on Philosophy Born of Struggle including interviews of African American philosophers, past keynote speakers, and various literatures can be found at:
 
 
Submission Guidelines:
 
Please email a Microsoft Word document including the title, abstract, institutional affiliation, rank or occupation, and email address of the presenters or panelists to:
PBSconference@gmail.com by July 1st, 2015. Please use “PBOS 2015 Submission” as the subject of the email.
Registration, along with information about conference rates at the hotel, our keynote speakers and directions to the conference, has already been made available for your convenience at:

ILA | Award CFPs Clark Student Research and Jablin Dissertation

Students, Win $1000 Plus Trip to ILA’s 17th Annual Conference in Barcelona, Spain!

 Kenneth E. Clark Student Research Award Deadline: June 12, 2015 Learn more: http://goo.gl/znuA9C

 Fredric M. Jablin Doctoral Dissertation Award Deadline: July 6, 2015 Learn more: http://goo.gl/pv4RqD

Each year the ILA partners with the Center for Creative Leadership (Clark Award) and the Jepson School of Leadership Studies (Jablin Award) to recognize and showcase outstanding student work. The winner of each award will receive a $1,000 cash prize plus travel, hotel, and registration expenses to attend ILA’s 17th Annual Global Conference in Barcelona, October 14-17, where the award will be given. The winners will also present their winning work during a concurrent session at the conference. For complete submission details, please visit the links above for each award.

 

p.s.  Registration for ILA 2015 in Barcelona is now open.  Visit: http://goo.gl/4g2TSd for details.

Penumbra, Issue 2 Now Live!

Hello,

I am happy to announce the publication of the second issue of Penumbra, the journal of the PhD in Interdisciplinary Studies program at the Union Institute & University. Visit http://unionpenumbra.org/ to read critical and creative works aligned with our mission to publish socially engaged innovative, creative, and critical scholarship, with a focus on ethical, political, and aesthetic issues in the humanities, public policy, and leadership.

 

Penumbra is currently accepting Reviewers and Submitters of scholarly and creative works. If you are interested in getting involved, please register yourself with the journal’s management system located here: http://journal.myunion.edu/index.php/penumbra/login

 

Our regards,

 

Gariot P. Louima (Cohort 12)

Editor

Penumbra: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Critical and Creative Inquiry

2015 Tobias Leadership Conference- Call for Abstracts- Due Feb 1

www.tobiascenter.iu.edu

10th Annual Tobias Leadership Conference

Call for Abstracts

Indiana University – Randall L. Tobias Center for Leadership Excellence

Entire Spectrum of
Leadership Represented:

Corporate Leadership
Not-for-profit Leadership
Religious Leadership
Educational Leadership
Medical Leadership
Government Leadership

Military Leadership

HOLD THE DATE!

APRIL 30 – MAY 2, 2015

Click here to register for the Conference

Contact Us:

Indiana University
Randall L. Tobias Center for Leadership Excellence
801 W. Michigan Street Indianapolis, IN 46202

www.tobiascenter.iu.edu
tcle@iupui.edu
317.278.2800

2015 Tobias Leadership Conference
Indianapolis, Indiana | April 30 – May 2, 2015

Please share your interest in leadership by responding to this Call for Abstracts for the Tobias Leadership Conference April 30 – May 2, 2015, presented by the Randall L. Tobias Center for Leadership Excellence at Indiana University. We are encouraging papers and panels from all academic disciplines. A primary purpose of this conference is to promote interdisciplinary collaboration and facilitate the exchange of ideas on the broad subject of leadership.

Abstracts should be no more than 300 words and should describe the proposed paper, panel or discussion session.

Acceptance of Abstract will be confirmed via email after February 9, 2015.

Due Date for Abstracts: February 1, 2015. 

Please note: all participants must pay their own hotel, conference registration fee, and travel expenses.

Please email your submissions in a .pdf or Word file to the Tobias Center for Leadership Excellence at tcle@iupui.edu.

Please share this information with colleagues and mark your calendars to attend.

The conference registration fee is $250. Online registration and additional information is available at www.tobiascenter.iu.edu or by calling (317) 278-2800.

The Conference will be held at the Alexander Hotel in Indianapolis. The forum will begin with a reception on Thursday evening, April 30th. Multiple sessions will be held Friday and Saturday consisting of speaker presentations, panel discussions, and research presentations concerning the broad topic of leadership. There will be a gala dinner Friday evening at the Alexander. The opening reception, conference lunches and gala dinner are included with conference registration.

Click HERE to email your abstract.