ILA’s 17th Annual Conference in Barcelona

Looking for funding to attend ILA’s 17th Annual Conference in Barcelona?

If you are a student or recent graduate (within 1-year), submit your paper to the Kenneth E. Clark Student Research Award.  If your paper wins, you’ll receive a free trip to ILA’s 17th annual global conference in Barcelona (air, hotel, and conference registration) PLUS a $1,000 cash prize PLUS a guaranteed presentation slot in the program to share your research.

See complete submission details at: http://goo.gl/QUDwQ9

The International Leadership Association (ILA) is pleased to join with the Center for Creative Leadership (CCL) to co-sponsor the annual Kenneth E. Clark Student Research Award to recognize outstanding unpublished papers by undergraduate and graduate students. The award is named in honor of the distinguished scholar and former Chief Executive Officer of CCL.

Looking for additional opportunities for students at ILA Barcelona?

Fredric M. Jablin Doctoral Dissertation Award (Deadline July 6) Details: http://goo.gl/V40Tzg

9th Annual Student Case Competition (Sign-Up by Sep. 13) Details: http://goo.gl/gaRNqo

 

P.S.  Registration for ILA Barcelona is now open.  Visit the conference home page at http://goo.gl/CMvyzj for details.

Dr. Ricardo Smith recent Ph.D. graduate featured in City Beat

Good news,

 

Dr. Ricardo Smith and his research is featured in this week’s City Beat. Although the article does not credit Union for his dissertation, it is good exposure for the important work Dr. Smith is doing. I really enjoyed meeting him and telling his story.

 In addition to the City Beat feature, he was profiled on our web and interviewed by a local radio station.

 Here is the link to City Beat http://npaper-wehaa.com/city-beat//#2015/06/03/?article=2527984&dpg=1&z=92

 

Here is the link to blog profile https://www.myunion.edu/spotlight-on-alumnus-dr-ricardo-y-smith/

 

Here is the link to his radio article http://wvxu.org/post/small-study-points-problems-local-prison-re-entry#stream/0

Spotlight on Alumnus Dr. Ricardo Y. Smith

Dr Ricardo Y Smith

What are the most critical issues facing post-prison African-American men in Hamilton and Butler counties?

Employment
Housing
Registering to vote

Alumnus Dr. Ricardo Y. Smith (Ph.D. 2014) gives voice to local men facing these issues in his 2014 doctoral dissertation, No Way Out: Giving Voice to the Post-Prison Experiences of African-American Men in Two Ohio Counties.

Dr. Ricardo Smith is a Gulf War Veteran (1990-1994), a distinguished honor graduate from the United States Army Signal School in Augusta, Georgia, and an adjunct instructor in psychology at Cincinnati State Technical & Community College. Dr. Smith spent three and a half years researching and two months interviewing 10 formerly incarcerated African American men from Hamilton and Butler counties. A critical interpretative analysis conducted through in-depth interviews that examined the post-prison lives of African American men, his study addressed the post-prison obstacles of ex-offenders as they struggled to find employment, housing, and registering to vote. Dr. Smith examined the problems and the impact of labeling prisoners and investigated the issues of prison debt and prison money-making plots. The policy restraints impacting the lives of ex-offenders (who usually come from targeted poor communities) are described as an apparatus of social control, particularly upon African-American men. He found that ex-offenders often experience a post-prison system of no way out that has become a type of social incarceration.

Dr. Smith’s research questions focused on the post-prison impact on the lived experiences of 10 African American men. His hope was to give voice to these men as they attempt to rebuild their lives after prison, particularly as it relates to two questions:

• When returning to communities where social barriers exist and persist, what barriers do the men recognize? To what extent do these barriers affect their lives post-prison?

• To what extent do the men recognize the impact of the criminal label (criminal for life) on their lives post-prison? How does this label affect them when they are seeking employment, permanent housing, and trying to vote?

Dr. Smith hopes that scholars can better understand the dynamics of what it means to (re)live life post-prison. His recommendations for future research include the necessity to examine how and why the lack of employment remains the number one problem for returning citizens after prison. The men he interviewed returned to communities where jobs and housing remain scarce. If the returning citizen does not go to a halfway house or have family housing support, there are very few housing options through public assistance. Not being able to find housing or employment has been shown to lead to significant relapse implications and high probable rates of recidivism.

Dr. Smith points out that the ethnic minority prison population continues to rise. As a people, African Americans make up less than 15 percent of the U.S. population but almost 43 percent of the U.S. prison population. Are African Americans more criminal? Dr. Smith says the answer is no, but does answer yes to the fact that black persons are convicted and sent to prison statistically more often than other ethnic groups, particularly for federal drug convictions. He sees it as a racialized mechanism of incarceration that has produced a major social problem for young black teens and men.

More research is needed to evaluate and gauge the success of reentry and reintegration. Without statistics and stories to measure work and housing efficacy of ex-offenders, how can reintegration or rehabilitation be effective in terms of successful reentry? Without a permanent address, being registered to vote becomes another barrier of reintegration. Dr. Smith explains that ex-offenders need a second chance to redeem themselves and become contributing citizens in society. First steps of viable employment, housing, and the opportunity to vote will give the returning citizen a chance of true reintegration into the community. Reinvestment in people will increase public safety and reduce recidivism for the collective betterment of society and all communities.

In addition to his 2014 Ph.D. in Interdisciplinary Studies from Union Institute & University, Dr. Smith holds a master’s degree in Human Relations (Applied Psychology) from the University of Oklahoma, and a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science from the University of Cincinnati.

Dr. Smith’s dissertation about post-prison experiences of African Americans was featured on WVXU radio in Cincinnati in April 2015.

Learn more about Union’s Ph.D. in Interdisciplinary Studies program.

 

Penumbra, Issue 2 Now Live!

Hello,

I am happy to announce the publication of the second issue of Penumbra, the journal of the PhD in Interdisciplinary Studies program at the Union Institute & University. Visit http://unionpenumbra.org/ to read critical and creative works aligned with our mission to publish socially engaged innovative, creative, and critical scholarship, with a focus on ethical, political, and aesthetic issues in the humanities, public policy, and leadership.

 

Penumbra is currently accepting Reviewers and Submitters of scholarly and creative works. If you are interested in getting involved, please register yourself with the journal’s management system located here: http://journal.myunion.edu/index.php/penumbra/login

 

Our regards,

 

Gariot P. Louima (Cohort 12)

Editor

Penumbra: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Critical and Creative Inquiry

Help Finding Outside Scholarships

Scholarship Tips

Tip #1— Apply for financial aid.

Many students make the mistake of not applying for aid because they assume they won’t qualify. Plenty of scholarships and free grants are available regardless of income, but you will need to complete the Free Applica­tion for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) to be eligible. File your FAFSA beginning January 1 of each year at www.fafsa.ed.gov UI&U’s federal school code is 010923.

Tip #2— Apply for as many outside scholarships as possible.

Do your research. In addition to the UI&U’s website, look for scholarships at religious organizations, local and national groups such as Rotary Clubs, profes­sional unions, and labor organizations. Several small scholar­ships can pay off just as well as one large one.

 

Tip # 3— Beat the crowd early application is suggested.

Deadlines for scholarships will vary greatly. We suggest trying to submit your scholarship application six months before you plan on enrolling. Don’t wait until the last minute to submit your application. Scholar­ship committees receive hundreds of applications from students who meet the stated requirements. In those cases, scholarship awards are given on a first-come, first-served basis.

 

Tip #4— Magnify your chance of success.

Carefully read the requirements for each scholarship. Apply for all scholarships if you meet the eligibility re­quirements. Your application will likely be discarded if it is incomplete. Whenever possible, supplement your application with personal letters of recommendation.

Beware of Scholarship Scams.

 

 

 

Union Institute & University

Check the following free online resources:

http://www.fastweb.com

http://www.college-scholarships.com

http://www.collegenet.com/mach25

http://www.scholarsaid.com

http://www.finaid.org/scholarships/

http://www.scholarshipexperts.com

http://www.scholarship-page.com

http://www.collegeboard.com/pay

http://www.gocollege.com

http://www.chegg.com/scholarship

 

 

How Class Works – 2016 Conference June 9-11, 2016 @ SUNY Stony Brook

HOW CLASS WORKS – 2016

A Conference at SUNY Stony Brook

June 9-11, 2016

CALL FOR PRESENTATIONS

The Center for Study of Working Class Life is pleased to announce the How Class Works

– 2016 Conference, to be held at the State University of New York at Stony Brook, June

9-11, 2016. Proposals for papers, presentations, and sessions are welcome until

December 9, 2015, according to the guidelines below. For more information, visit our

Web site at <www.stonybrook.edu/workingclass>.

Purpose and orientation: This conference explores ways in which an explicit

recognition of class helps to understand the social world in which we live, and the variety

of ways in which analysis of societies can deepen our understanding of class as a social

relationship across the globe. Theoretical and historical presentations should take as their

point of reference the lived experience of class in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries,

within nations and internationally. Presentations are welcome from people outside

academic life when they sum up and reflect upon social experience in ways that

contribute to conference themes and discussion. Formal papers are welcome but are not

required. All presentations should be accessible to an interdisciplinary audience.

Conference themes: The conference welcomes proposals for sessions and presentations

that advance our understanding of any of the following themes:

The mosaic of class, race, and gender: To explore how class shapes racial, gender, and

ethnic experience, and how different racial, gender, and ethnic experiences within various

classes shape the meaning of class.

Class, power, and social structure: To explore how the social lives of working, middle,

and capitalist classes are structured by various forms of power; to explore ways in which

class dynamics shape power structures in workplaces and across broader societies.

Class in an age of income inequality: To explore the implications and consequences

of the growing income gap between top earners and the rest for the lived experience in

class in different corners of the world.

Class, Community, and the Environment: To explore ways in which class informs

communities and environmental conditions where people work as well as where they

live; also to consider questions of “home,” community formation and sustenance, and

environmental justice.

Class in a global economy: To explore how class identity and class dynamics are

influenced by globalization, including the transnational movements of industry, capital,

and capitalist elites; the experience of cross-border labor migration and organizing; and

international labor and environmental standards.

Middle class? Working class? What’s the difference and why does it matter? To

explore the claim that the U.S. and other developed nations have become middle class

societies, contrasting with the notion that the working class is the majority; to unpack the

relationships between the middle class and capitalist, working and other subordinate

classes both in the developed and the developing world.

Class, public policy, and electoral politics: To explore how class affects public

deliberations and policy in a variety of nations around the world, with special attention to

health care, the criminal justice system, labor law, poverty, tax and other economic

policy, housing, and education; to explore the place of electoral politics in the

arrangement of class forces on policy matters.

Class and culture: To explore ways in which cultures and subcultures transmit, sustain,

and transform class dynamics around the world.

Pedagogy of class: To explore techniques and materials useful for teaching about class,

at K-12 levels, in college and university courses, and in labor studies and adult education

courses.

How to submit proposals for How Class Works – 2016 Conference: We encourage

proposals for panel sessions (three or four papers) and roundtables that bring diverse

perspectives and experiences into dialogue: scholars with activists; those working on

similar themes in different disciplines; as well as those working on similar issues in

different parts of the world. Proposals for individual presentations are also welcome.

Proposals for presentations must include the following information [for session

proposals this information must be included for all proposed presentations, as well as

indication of presenters’ willingness to participate]: a) short descriptive title; b) which of

the conference themes will be addressed; c) a maximum 250 word summary of the main

subject matter, points, and methodology; d) relevant personal information indicating

institutional affiliation (if any) and what training or experience the presenter brings to the

proposal; e) presenter’s name, address, telephone, fax, and e-mail address. A person may

present in at most two conference sessions. To allow time for discussion, sessions will be

limited to three twenty-minute or four fifteen-minute principal presentations. Sessions

will not include official discussants.

Submit proposals as an e-mail attachment to michael.zweig@stonybrook.edu or as hard

copy by mail to the How Class Works – 2016 Conference, Center for Study of Working

Class Life, Department of Economics, SUNY, Stony Brook, NY 11794-4384.

Timetable: Proposals must be received by December 9, 2015. After review by the

program committee, notifications will be mailed by the end of January 2016. The

conference will be at SUNY Stony Brook June 9-11, 2016. Conference registration and

housing reservations will be possible after March 7, 2016. Details and updates will be

posted at http://www.stonybrook.edu/workingclass

Conference coordinator:

Michael Zweig

Director, Center for Study of Working Class Life

Department of Economics

State University of New York

Stony Brook, NY 11794-4384

631.632.7536

michael.zweig@stonybrook.edu

How Class Works – 2016 Conference

hcw2014

REGISTRATION

Registration will open on March 7, 2016

Call for Papers – African Studies at the 2015 Midwest Popular Culture Association (MPCA)

Call for Papers – African Studies at the 2015 Midwest Popular Culture Association (MPCA)

Thursday-Sunday, 1-4 October 2015

Hilton Cincinnati Netherland Plaza

35 West Fifth Street, Cincinnati, OH, 45202

Submission Deadline Extended to May 15, 2015

African Studies

The African Studies area of the Midwest Popular Culture Association/Midwest American Culture Association is now accepting proposals for its 2015 conference in Cincinnati, OH. We are looking for papers that examine any aspect of African studies relevant to culture, from any time period, using any scholarly method.

Topics of particularly interest for paper or panel proposals include, but are not limited to:

• Impact of Western news and/or entertainment media representations of Africa and/or African responses to Western media representation

• Comparative approaches to African and other cultures

• Technology use in Africa

• Impact of social media on life in Africa, especially in establishing connections between those in Africa and those on other continents

• Impact of (popular) culture on politics in Africa and politics of Africa in other places

• Approaches to tourism and/or urbanization and culture in Africa

To submit a paper to the African Studies area, register on the submission website submissions.mpcaaca.org and submit a paper abstract of 250 words or a panel proposal including short abstracts and titles of each prospective paper. Include in your submission the name, affiliation, address, and e-mail address of each author/participant. You must specify any special AV or scheduling needs when submitting your proposal. MPCA/ACA can provide an LCD projector for presentations. Please do not submit the same item to more than one Area.

Graduate student travel grants may be available. Visit http://mpcaaca.org/info/travel-grants/ for more information.

If you have any questions about submissions to the African Studies area, please contact area chair Amy Harth at amy.harth@email.myunion.edu.

Amy E. Harth African Studies Area Chair Ph.D. Program in Interdisciplinary Studies Union Institute & University Email: amy.harth@email.myunion.edu http://mpcaaca.org/Visit the website at