ILA’s 17th Annual Conference in Barcelona

Looking for funding to attend ILA’s 17th Annual Conference in Barcelona?

If you are a student or recent graduate (within 1-year), submit your paper to the Kenneth E. Clark Student Research Award.  If your paper wins, you’ll receive a free trip to ILA’s 17th annual global conference in Barcelona (air, hotel, and conference registration) PLUS a $1,000 cash prize PLUS a guaranteed presentation slot in the program to share your research.

See complete submission details at: http://goo.gl/QUDwQ9

The International Leadership Association (ILA) is pleased to join with the Center for Creative Leadership (CCL) to co-sponsor the annual Kenneth E. Clark Student Research Award to recognize outstanding unpublished papers by undergraduate and graduate students. The award is named in honor of the distinguished scholar and former Chief Executive Officer of CCL.

Looking for additional opportunities for students at ILA Barcelona?

Fredric M. Jablin Doctoral Dissertation Award (Deadline July 6) Details: http://goo.gl/V40Tzg

9th Annual Student Case Competition (Sign-Up by Sep. 13) Details: http://goo.gl/gaRNqo

 

P.S.  Registration for ILA Barcelona is now open.  Visit the conference home page at http://goo.gl/CMvyzj for details.

Philosophy Born of Struggle 2015 Call for Papers

PHILOSOPHY  Born To Struggle XXII 2015 Annual Meeting

November 6-7, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT
Embodied Philosophy and Epistemologies of Liberation could refer to any number of strategies or conceptualizations imagined by oppressed peoples to deal with the various manifestations of (neo) colonial, (neo) liberal, sexual, and psychic oppression. Questions emerging from this year’s theme include: Do embodied philosophies challenge the notion of philosophy itself? Can embodied philosophy aim to be universalizable? If philosophies are necessarily situated, products of time and place, what are the theoretical benefits and limitations of Black, feminist, working class, or queer consciousness? Are there epistemic consequences of both oppression and the cultivation of ignorance that effect liberation? What would epistemic independence or epistemic liberation look like? Is anywhere or anyone free of epistemic ignorance? In a world full of epistemic obstructions and dehumanization, how can the oppressed construct livable futures? How do the oppressed gain clarity through the concepts of new slaves and a reinvented Jim Crow? What are the values of ideal and non-ideal theories of justice in the face of fragmented epistemologies? PBS welcomes any papers inspired by or creatively engaging this year’s theme. The

 
Philosophy Born of Struggle (PBS)conference was first organized in 1993 by J. Everet Green at Rockland Community College, and officially took on the name Philosophy Born of Struggle several years later to continue the study and traditions announced by Leonard Harris’s anthology Philosophy Born of Struggle: Anthology of Afro- American Philosophy from 1917.
Every year PBS enjoys being hosted by universities, colleges, and community colleges throughout the country. For over two decades, PBS has remained a traveling conference dedicated to bringing Africana philosophy to various communities, be they academic or not, in the United States. PBS is an interdisciplinary and open philosophical community. We welcome interlocutors from all traditions, including but not limited to Afrocentrism, womanism, feminism, queer/quare/trans theory, Marxism, Pan-Africanism, pragmatism, and existentialism. We also welcome participants regardless of discipline and professional affiliation.
More information on Philosophy Born of Struggle including interviews of African American philosophers, past keynote speakers, and various literatures can be found at:
 
 
Submission Guidelines:
 
Please email a Microsoft Word document including the title, abstract, institutional affiliation, rank or occupation, and email address of the presenters or panelists to:
PBSconference@gmail.com by July 1st, 2015. Please use “PBOS 2015 Submission” as the subject of the email.
Registration, along with information about conference rates at the hotel, our keynote speakers and directions to the conference, has already been made available for your convenience at:

ILA | Award CFPs Clark Student Research and Jablin Dissertation

Students, Win $1000 Plus Trip to ILA’s 17th Annual Conference in Barcelona, Spain!

 Kenneth E. Clark Student Research Award Deadline: June 12, 2015 Learn more: http://goo.gl/znuA9C

 Fredric M. Jablin Doctoral Dissertation Award Deadline: July 6, 2015 Learn more: http://goo.gl/pv4RqD

Each year the ILA partners with the Center for Creative Leadership (Clark Award) and the Jepson School of Leadership Studies (Jablin Award) to recognize and showcase outstanding student work. The winner of each award will receive a $1,000 cash prize plus travel, hotel, and registration expenses to attend ILA’s 17th Annual Global Conference in Barcelona, October 14-17, where the award will be given. The winners will also present their winning work during a concurrent session at the conference. For complete submission details, please visit the links above for each award.

 

p.s.  Registration for ILA 2015 in Barcelona is now open.  Visit: http://goo.gl/4g2TSd for details.

Penumbra, Issue 2 Now Live!

Hello,

I am happy to announce the publication of the second issue of Penumbra, the journal of the PhD in Interdisciplinary Studies program at the Union Institute & University. Visit http://unionpenumbra.org/ to read critical and creative works aligned with our mission to publish socially engaged innovative, creative, and critical scholarship, with a focus on ethical, political, and aesthetic issues in the humanities, public policy, and leadership.

 

Penumbra is currently accepting Reviewers and Submitters of scholarly and creative works. If you are interested in getting involved, please register yourself with the journal’s management system located here: http://journal.myunion.edu/index.php/penumbra/login

 

Our regards,

 

Gariot P. Louima (Cohort 12)

Editor

Penumbra: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Critical and Creative Inquiry

How Class Works – 2016 Conference June 9-11, 2016 @ SUNY Stony Brook

HOW CLASS WORKS – 2016

A Conference at SUNY Stony Brook

June 9-11, 2016

CALL FOR PRESENTATIONS

The Center for Study of Working Class Life is pleased to announce the How Class Works

– 2016 Conference, to be held at the State University of New York at Stony Brook, June

9-11, 2016. Proposals for papers, presentations, and sessions are welcome until

December 9, 2015, according to the guidelines below. For more information, visit our

Web site at <www.stonybrook.edu/workingclass>.

Purpose and orientation: This conference explores ways in which an explicit

recognition of class helps to understand the social world in which we live, and the variety

of ways in which analysis of societies can deepen our understanding of class as a social

relationship across the globe. Theoretical and historical presentations should take as their

point of reference the lived experience of class in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries,

within nations and internationally. Presentations are welcome from people outside

academic life when they sum up and reflect upon social experience in ways that

contribute to conference themes and discussion. Formal papers are welcome but are not

required. All presentations should be accessible to an interdisciplinary audience.

Conference themes: The conference welcomes proposals for sessions and presentations

that advance our understanding of any of the following themes:

The mosaic of class, race, and gender: To explore how class shapes racial, gender, and

ethnic experience, and how different racial, gender, and ethnic experiences within various

classes shape the meaning of class.

Class, power, and social structure: To explore how the social lives of working, middle,

and capitalist classes are structured by various forms of power; to explore ways in which

class dynamics shape power structures in workplaces and across broader societies.

Class in an age of income inequality: To explore the implications and consequences

of the growing income gap between top earners and the rest for the lived experience in

class in different corners of the world.

Class, Community, and the Environment: To explore ways in which class informs

communities and environmental conditions where people work as well as where they

live; also to consider questions of “home,” community formation and sustenance, and

environmental justice.

Class in a global economy: To explore how class identity and class dynamics are

influenced by globalization, including the transnational movements of industry, capital,

and capitalist elites; the experience of cross-border labor migration and organizing; and

international labor and environmental standards.

Middle class? Working class? What’s the difference and why does it matter? To

explore the claim that the U.S. and other developed nations have become middle class

societies, contrasting with the notion that the working class is the majority; to unpack the

relationships between the middle class and capitalist, working and other subordinate

classes both in the developed and the developing world.

Class, public policy, and electoral politics: To explore how class affects public

deliberations and policy in a variety of nations around the world, with special attention to

health care, the criminal justice system, labor law, poverty, tax and other economic

policy, housing, and education; to explore the place of electoral politics in the

arrangement of class forces on policy matters.

Class and culture: To explore ways in which cultures and subcultures transmit, sustain,

and transform class dynamics around the world.

Pedagogy of class: To explore techniques and materials useful for teaching about class,

at K-12 levels, in college and university courses, and in labor studies and adult education

courses.

How to submit proposals for How Class Works – 2016 Conference: We encourage

proposals for panel sessions (three or four papers) and roundtables that bring diverse

perspectives and experiences into dialogue: scholars with activists; those working on

similar themes in different disciplines; as well as those working on similar issues in

different parts of the world. Proposals for individual presentations are also welcome.

Proposals for presentations must include the following information [for session

proposals this information must be included for all proposed presentations, as well as

indication of presenters’ willingness to participate]: a) short descriptive title; b) which of

the conference themes will be addressed; c) a maximum 250 word summary of the main

subject matter, points, and methodology; d) relevant personal information indicating

institutional affiliation (if any) and what training or experience the presenter brings to the

proposal; e) presenter’s name, address, telephone, fax, and e-mail address. A person may

present in at most two conference sessions. To allow time for discussion, sessions will be

limited to three twenty-minute or four fifteen-minute principal presentations. Sessions

will not include official discussants.

Submit proposals as an e-mail attachment to michael.zweig@stonybrook.edu or as hard

copy by mail to the How Class Works – 2016 Conference, Center for Study of Working

Class Life, Department of Economics, SUNY, Stony Brook, NY 11794-4384.

Timetable: Proposals must be received by December 9, 2015. After review by the

program committee, notifications will be mailed by the end of January 2016. The

conference will be at SUNY Stony Brook June 9-11, 2016. Conference registration and

housing reservations will be possible after March 7, 2016. Details and updates will be

posted at http://www.stonybrook.edu/workingclass

Conference coordinator:

Michael Zweig

Director, Center for Study of Working Class Life

Department of Economics

State University of New York

Stony Brook, NY 11794-4384

631.632.7536

michael.zweig@stonybrook.edu

How Class Works – 2016 Conference

hcw2014

REGISTRATION

Registration will open on March 7, 2016

Announcing the Second Edition of the Benjamin B. Ferencz Essay Competition: On the relation between unlawful use of force and the war crime of disproportionate force not justified by military necessity

Announcing the Second Edition of the Benjamin B. Ferencz Essay Competition: On the relation between unlawful use of force and the war crime of disproportionate force not justified by military necessity
 
$10,000 Prize for first place; $2,500 for second and third place! 
 
** Please pass this on to a colleague or student who you think may be interested **

At the Nuremberg trial, the British Prosecutor, Sir Hartley Shawcross, famously said: “The killing of combatants in war is justifiable, both in international and in municipal law, only where the war itself is legal. But where the war is illegal … there is nothing to justify the killing, and these murders are not to be distinguished from those of any other lawless robber bands.”

In the years since Nuremberg, however, jus ad bellum (the legality of launching a war) and jus in bello (the legality of the conduct of the war) have largely been viewed as distinct and unrelated.  The conventional view is that the crime of aggression (jus ad bellum) cannot now be tried at the International Criminal Court (ICC), whose jurisdiction is currently limited to war crimes, crimes against humanity, and genocide.  But some commentators and jurists have suggested that the law of war proportionality and necessity principles may be judged in part based on the legality of the war and its military objective, thereby enabling the ICC to consider the question of jus ad bellum in a war crimes trial.

Individuals interested in addressing the relationship between jus ad bellum and jus in bello in the context of modern war crimes trials are invited to participate in the second edition of the Benjamin B. Ferencz Essay Competition, hosted by the Frederick K. Cox International Law Center at Case Western Reserve University School of Law.  The contest is named in honor of famed Nuremberg Prosecutor, Ben Ferencz, who has devoted his life to achieving peace through justice. 

Prizes*

The first-place winner will receive an award of $10,000 (USD) and a plaque commemorating the achievement. Second- and third-place runners-up each will receive an honorable mention and a plaque as well as runner-up awards in the amount of $2,500 (USD).  All three top essays will be published in the spring 2016 volume of the Case Western Reserve Journal of International Law.

Contest Rules
 
Scholars, students, and practitioners are all encouraged to participate.  Co-written entries are permitted (with the prize split between co-authors).

If you are interested in entering the contest, you must register your intent to participate by emailing Michael.scharf@case.edu by May 15, 2015.  Please include your contact information and affiliation.

The deadline for submission of completed essays is Friday, Aug. 28, 2015, at 5 P.M. (EST).  Completed essays must be emailed as a word attachment toMichael.scharf@case.edu by that date.

 

Essays should be approximately 25-40 pages in length (single spaced, 12 point font with between 100-300 footnotes).  They should be in the form of a balanced scholarly treatment of the issue, fully analyzing/critiquing both sides and considering a range of possible scenarios.  Submissions will be judged by an international panel of experts, chaired by Dean Michael Scharf of Case Western Reserve University School of Law.

The winners will be notified by email and publicly announced at the opening of International Law Weekend Midwest, “The International Law Legacy of the Obama Administration,” held at Case Western Reserve University on September 18, 2015, which will be webcast live at: http://law.case.edu/Lectures.

*The sponsors/organizers reserve the right not to award one or more of the prizes in the event of insufficient participation at a sufficiently high quality of scholarship.

 

Call for Papers – African Studies at the 2015 Midwest Popular Culture Association (MPCA)

Call for Papers – African Studies at the 2015 Midwest Popular Culture Association (MPCA)

Thursday-Sunday, 1-4 October 2015

Hilton Cincinnati Netherland Plaza

35 West Fifth Street, Cincinnati, OH, 45202

Submission Deadline Extended to May 15, 2015

African Studies

The African Studies area of the Midwest Popular Culture Association/Midwest American Culture Association is now accepting proposals for its 2015 conference in Cincinnati, OH. We are looking for papers that examine any aspect of African studies relevant to culture, from any time period, using any scholarly method.

Topics of particularly interest for paper or panel proposals include, but are not limited to:

• Impact of Western news and/or entertainment media representations of Africa and/or African responses to Western media representation

• Comparative approaches to African and other cultures

• Technology use in Africa

• Impact of social media on life in Africa, especially in establishing connections between those in Africa and those on other continents

• Impact of (popular) culture on politics in Africa and politics of Africa in other places

• Approaches to tourism and/or urbanization and culture in Africa

To submit a paper to the African Studies area, register on the submission website submissions.mpcaaca.org and submit a paper abstract of 250 words or a panel proposal including short abstracts and titles of each prospective paper. Include in your submission the name, affiliation, address, and e-mail address of each author/participant. You must specify any special AV or scheduling needs when submitting your proposal. MPCA/ACA can provide an LCD projector for presentations. Please do not submit the same item to more than one Area.

Graduate student travel grants may be available. Visit http://mpcaaca.org/info/travel-grants/ for more information.

If you have any questions about submissions to the African Studies area, please contact area chair Amy Harth at amy.harth@email.myunion.edu.

Amy E. Harth African Studies Area Chair Ph.D. Program in Interdisciplinary Studies Union Institute & University Email: amy.harth@email.myunion.edu http://mpcaaca.org/Visit the website at