Philosophy Born of Struggle 2015 Call for Papers

PHILOSOPHY  Born To Struggle XXII 2015 Annual Meeting

November 6-7, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT
Embodied Philosophy and Epistemologies of Liberation could refer to any number of strategies or conceptualizations imagined by oppressed peoples to deal with the various manifestations of (neo) colonial, (neo) liberal, sexual, and psychic oppression. Questions emerging from this year’s theme include: Do embodied philosophies challenge the notion of philosophy itself? Can embodied philosophy aim to be universalizable? If philosophies are necessarily situated, products of time and place, what are the theoretical benefits and limitations of Black, feminist, working class, or queer consciousness? Are there epistemic consequences of both oppression and the cultivation of ignorance that effect liberation? What would epistemic independence or epistemic liberation look like? Is anywhere or anyone free of epistemic ignorance? In a world full of epistemic obstructions and dehumanization, how can the oppressed construct livable futures? How do the oppressed gain clarity through the concepts of new slaves and a reinvented Jim Crow? What are the values of ideal and non-ideal theories of justice in the face of fragmented epistemologies? PBS welcomes any papers inspired by or creatively engaging this year’s theme. The

 
Philosophy Born of Struggle (PBS)conference was first organized in 1993 by J. Everet Green at Rockland Community College, and officially took on the name Philosophy Born of Struggle several years later to continue the study and traditions announced by Leonard Harris’s anthology Philosophy Born of Struggle: Anthology of Afro- American Philosophy from 1917.
Every year PBS enjoys being hosted by universities, colleges, and community colleges throughout the country. For over two decades, PBS has remained a traveling conference dedicated to bringing Africana philosophy to various communities, be they academic or not, in the United States. PBS is an interdisciplinary and open philosophical community. We welcome interlocutors from all traditions, including but not limited to Afrocentrism, womanism, feminism, queer/quare/trans theory, Marxism, Pan-Africanism, pragmatism, and existentialism. We also welcome participants regardless of discipline and professional affiliation.
More information on Philosophy Born of Struggle including interviews of African American philosophers, past keynote speakers, and various literatures can be found at:
 
 
Submission Guidelines:
 
Please email a Microsoft Word document including the title, abstract, institutional affiliation, rank or occupation, and email address of the presenters or panelists to:
PBSconference@gmail.com by July 1st, 2015. Please use “PBOS 2015 Submission” as the subject of the email.
Registration, along with information about conference rates at the hotel, our keynote speakers and directions to the conference, has already been made available for your convenience at:
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